Thursday, April 5, 2018

Mondrian :: Colorful and Simple

Part of coming up with new ideas for quilts is exploring art.  From modern to abstract, one thing there is not a lack of is inspiration.  The old adage 'art is subjective' really means you either like it or you don't!  I look at something and get a hit one way or the other right away.  Be that art, a house or a car!  Exposing or exploring yourself to different things is important for growth in life, or as I like to use it...quilting!

And there is art that is truly iconic.  That needs no explanation and certainly it doesn't need to be improved upon.  

Composition II 1930
Piet Mondrian was a Dutch artist known for being one of the pioneers of the abstract art movement.  I believe his most recognizable art is the iconic red, blue, yellow, white and black compositions.  Simple or detailed, there's something for everyone!

9" x 8 1/4"
As I was quilting a pile of pot holders, I thought to myself...I wanna do something different!  Something I haven't done yet, something easy, something fast.  And for some reason Mondrian came to mind.  Simple right?!  Primary colors in rectangles and squares.  Piece of cake! 


I was so engrossed in the puzzle that I didn't take any in progress pictures!  But I have this beautiful set of pot holders to show for it!

When I say puzzle, it really was a mind bending exercise in precision and fitting the pieces just right and being able to add the black around each little piece. 


The primary blocks vary in size from 1" square to 1 1/2" x 2" and the white sections, well let's just say they became whatever size I needed them to become!  

The tricky part was making sure I could puzzle the 1/4" black strips around and in between every piece.  You can't just add black around all the sides, you can't just sew a simple block and fit it with black and white...oh no no no!  So much for the simple and quick idea!


You have to puzzle the pieces together so they look random.  And you have to do it in a section kind of way so that all the parts and pieces come together...seamlessly, flawlessly,OCD-lessly!


The only simple part about the entire process was the quilting!  Minimal at it's finest!  Next time I may use black for the backing and black thread for quilting.  Oh...did I say next time?!

You might think I'm complaining and whining about making these, but I'm not.  I'm plotting and scheming my next move!  There are some areas in my interpretation of the design that could be fine tuned or totally removed.  My ultimate goal is to make a pattern so that I can go back to the pot holders when needed.  I think I can...I think I can...I think I can!


What draws me to this Mondrian design, is the illusion of simplicity.  If you dig in to it a bit more, you see that all isn't quite as simple as it seems.  What a genius!  Complicated simplicity!

What artist motivates and inspires you?  I don't usually go primary...but if it's Mondrian...to me...it's primary!

LINKING:

28 comments :

  1. love these! a couple years ago, I was in a bee and one of the gals requested Mondrian blocks. I didn't have a clue! it was fun to learn and explore... and yes, quite a puzzle!

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    1. They were a puzzle, but I was totally into the challenge! I very much enjoyed the process and cannot wait for another go at it!

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  2. Wonderful Jayne! A good friend of mine who sadly no longer blogs, and I talked oh, two years ago of doing a quilt as a nod to FLW; got lots of ideas, talked lots...and nada has happened! You nailed this Mondrian one. :-)

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    1. That would have been an amazing quilt! But theres still time to put your idea into action at some point! I am very happy with how these turned out. And as always it gets my brain working over time with ideas!

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  3. I think these turned out beautifully, Jayne, and they look deceptively simple. Keeping everything tidy with the 1/4" black strips took some serious skill!

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  4. Lately I have found ancient mosaics to be my inspiration and design choice. Many of the quilt blocks we use today such as flying geese, square in a square, hexie, and even compasses have been unearthed on mosaic pavements from the 1st and 2nd centuries.

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  5. These are awesome! His work is definitely inspiring - maybe you should do a big quilt like this!

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  6. I love the Mondrian at the intro to Green Acres!!! Your pot holders are so cool!

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  7. They are beautiful. Please tell me you are not going to use them as pot holders in real life. Such a pity to see them get dirty/scorched or is that just my pot holders..... Jenny, the lilac cat

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  8. I am not motivated by artist, sorry to be boring. LOL. I am inspired by color to create. Color in the every day world. I would say it's the fabric that starts my journey, or sometimes a pattern. Then I just try to marry the two.

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  9. Wow! Now that is some serious mathematics going on! Great job, Jayne! You are pulling me over to the mod side of quilting. I have hardly seen anything you make that I don't like and I consider myself to be fairly traditional. :)

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  10. This reminds me of Paper piecing stained glass work. I love how they turned out and would have a hard time using them as potholders. Maybe mug rugs instead.

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  11. These are fabulous Jayne! I love Mondrian and have often contemplated make a "something" in that style. Now I don't have to - I can just look at yours!!

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  12. They're wonderful! You are so right about looking simple and being complicated!

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  13. These are amazing. I don't think I'd want to use them as pot holders -- too pretty to use. There's something so classic and striking about primary colours.

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  14. Try using Excel to plan your design. One project my students had to do was make a Mondaian page using their Excel skills.

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  15. So neat! I've done projects where I had to keep measuring and cutting as I worked. It can be frustrating, but turned out fine.

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  16. Fabulous finish they are definitely too good to use, thanks for linking up to TGIFF!

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  17. Hi Jayne,
    I just love these, and the quilting! Minimal but perfect. On second look, I notice the red, yellow and blue now but at first glance I only saw the red with the black and white. LOVE! ~smile~ Roseanne

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  18. I do like Mondrian. I had a color block (double knit!) top with a similar pattern in the ‘90’s and felt very retro chic when I wore it. I considered making a quilt a few years ago after I saw a Mondrian jigsaw puzzle in a store. But it never happened so I’m glad you took it on. It’s interesting to me that you found it challenging to re-create in fabric—deceptively simple artwork.

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  19. Yep, Mondrian works are appealling, and the approach sure made for nice potholders. I giggled when I first saw you say "simple." :D

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  20. These are not pot holders. They belong on display. Truly stunning. I agree with some of the other commenters. At first glance they look like they would be such a simple project. You did an excellent job with this. I suspect you will continue to work on this type of design and I look forward to seeing what is next.

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  21. So very fun and bright and WOW-I am anxious to see next time's product!!

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  22. I'm with some of your other commenters - I couldn't use these for potholders either! They are so beautiful, Jayne!

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  23. Mondrian is one of my favorite artists. Love the primary colors.

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  24. These are so much fun Jayne! Primary colors are one of my favorite combinations. Your work is always so inspiring. Thanks for sharing with Oh Scrap!

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  25. They look lovely, Jayne. Your work is inspiring. I am sure they will be gifted, cherished, displayed, admired, shared (may be) and used (unlikely).

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