Sunday, March 15, 2020

INSPIRE :: Trapunto My Way

This isn't the first time I've done Trapunto and it won't be the last!  I'm pretty sure the way I do it isn't the proper way Trapunto is done, but my method works for me.  Which is why I like to call it Faux Trapunto!


INSPIRE
12" X 20"
We all have people, things or places that inspire us on a daily basis.  One definition of Inspire is:  fill (someone) with the urge or ability to do or feel something, especially to do something creative.  I think that pretty much sums it up for me.  Often I'll get that feeling and can't seem to shake it until I do something with it.  In my case it's almost always in the form of a quilt.



A few days ago I came across a batting panel I started many months ago.  Since I'm going through a 'use my stash' phase, this was the perfect opportunity to apply that in a slightly different way.  While I still used my stash, I also used a previous project that has languished by the wayside!

To make the panel I used 12 different shades of solids arranging them until I was pleased with the color placement.  Making improv curves is so satisfying!  We all say it, but it is liberating!  



This is the batting panel I found and used.  And this is where my method might be a bit different!  I use batting scraps that are cut in 1 1/2" strips.  Although I can't be certain of that it's been so long!  I take those strips, fold them in thirds and zig zag stitch down the center creating a 'batting rope'.

On the large piece of batting I draw my lettering/word, and then mold and form the letters cutting and puzzling until I'm satisfied.  I use washable school glue and a hot iron to set the rope.  



From there I lay my panel and pin in the usual quilt sandwich.  In order to see and know where the lettering is, I use a Hera Marker and carefully trace around each letter.

 

Here it is after I quilted around the letters.  The easiest way I've found to do that is by using my zipper foot.  It gets very little actual zipper action, but it works well for Faux Trapunto!  After attaching the foot, I adjust the needle position so that it is as close to the batting rope as possible.  

This is a slow process.  But one that gives me total control...as long as I take it slow and steady.  One day I think I'll try free motion quilting around the lettering, but for now I'll stick to what works.

After that it's the main event which I get back to using my walking foot.

  

I used 4 or 5 different thread colors and did a massive amount of matchstick quilting.  There are some tricky parts to quilt in and around the letters.  I do what I can with my walking foot around the letters, but the inside of the letters I had to FMQ.  To me, they need quilting in order to make the word stand out even more.  



I used a tutorial from Audrey of Cotton & Bourbon for the faced binding.  This is the second time I've used Audrey's tutorial and love it!  Her method uses one layer of fabric with a folded edge, which makes this type of binding less bulky around the corners.  



There might not be any quilting better than matchstick quilting!  I love the texture it creates.



As I said earlier, I've done this technique in various forms.  Here are a few links in case you're curious and want to see more:



I do like to push the limits or the norms once in a while.  It's nice to be able to explore and try ideas without worrying about making sure it's done the proper way.  Whatever works for you and you are comfortable with it...you should do it!  

LINKING:

30 comments :

  1. OMG, I really love this - thanks so much for sharing your method!!!! Would never have thought to do it this way but now I think I will give it a go!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The method is my way of accomplishing the look of trapunto, but it isn’t as ‘serious’! It works for me and I think it would work for just about anyone!

      Delete
  2. :) well that is certainly a different way of doing Trapunto and maybe easier in the long run! pretty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is different, but it works and it’s effective! I know it isn’t the traditional method…but I’ve never been much of a traditional girl!

      Delete
  3. FAAAABUlous! I'm in love. Thanks for sharing your technique and bravo! ;^)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I followed your links and recall some of the projects. Your technique is SEW super cool!! Thanks for sharing the details. Looking forward to giving it a try.

    ReplyDelete
  5. You have certainly inspired me to try this technique! It's a perfect project for this "coronacation" we are experiencing right now. Also, it's a great way to use up those long batting scraps...now I just need to remember to save them! Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope it inspires you to give it a try! You can certainly tweak my idea and make it your own or make it work for you. With social distancing, it might be the perfect time to try it!

      Delete
  6. Ohoh, clever way to add dimension!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your technique always amazes me. Thanks for sharing all about it!

    ReplyDelete
  8. That's so beautiful, Jayne! I've never done trapunto, so wouldn't know what the usual technique is - but yours worked to make a beautiful piece!

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a technique!! Great use for those odd batting scraps we all have. This appeals to me more than traditional trapunto, which, if I understand it correctly, involves making a cut in your backing. Scary!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It works so well and I’m getting more ideas….I guess this post should have said ‘to be continued’ and the end! Traditional Trapunto doesn’t appeal to me at all. I’ll stick to my method I think!

      Delete
    2. JanineMarie Doing Trapunto with a machine is not the same method as cutting the backing and stuffing batting in from the back. You lay a layer of batting under the area you want to rise up, stitch around your shape, cut away the batting outside the stitching line, then layer batting, backing and machine quilt.

      Delete
  10. I think your version of Trapunto is very fun; what a great project - it gives me ideas and is inspiring! :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love the soothing colors in this one Jayne. I want to try this technique one of these days. Thanks for sharing with Oh Scrap!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Your work is always an inspiration. Thank you for sharing the process.

    ReplyDelete
  13. What a great technique, I'll have to give this a try. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  14. That is so cool! I like seeing what your process it - very creative and inspiring

    ReplyDelete
  15. This is BRILLIANT, Jayne! What a fabulous way to trapunto the skinny lettering! Much better than layering a single piece of batting and trying to trim away the excess after stitching it down!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I love that you incorporated a word in trapunto! Great idea!

    ReplyDelete
  17. That is a very interesting technique, and it turned out so well!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Thanks for the tutorial! Love how it turned out! Haven't tried trapunto yet so I may try this!

    ReplyDelete
  19. That is so cool!!! One of these days I am going to try your improv curved piecing.

    ReplyDelete
  20. OMG, I love this! Thank you for explaining your method, I think I may have to give it a try soon. Definitely inspiring! <3

    ReplyDelete
  21. Love it. Thanks for the inspiration and tutorial!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Beautifully done! Love the color palette.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Very interesting technique, thanks for inspiring us😉

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting my blog! I love getting comments, and try to respond to each and every one.